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Clients often ask about whether their case has to automatically be dismissed due to a police officer's failure to read them their rights. While Miranda v. Arizona was a landmark Supreme Court case which established a critically important right for suspects in criminal cases, unfortunately the answer to this question is often "no." The rights which Miranda established in 1966, which everyone is familiar with from TV cop and lawyer shows, are essentially a protection against forced confessions. Miranda gave us the right to be warned by the police that they are NOT ON OUR SIDE, and that anything we say to them will be used against us in court. If the police interrogate you and force you to confess without having first explained your right t...

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"Hearsay" is one of those rules where the basic idea is simple, but it has about a million complicated exceptions. Many lawyers, prosecutors, and even judges get confused by the rules and exceptions in the heat of a trial or hearing. I will not be addressing all the different exceptions here, but will simply explain what the basic idea is. Hearsay is basically when a witness tries to testify that something is true because someone else told them so. For instance, if I were to testify and say "The Titans lost last night, I didn't see it but my friend Bob told me so" then that would be considered "hearsay" because I didn't see it for myself; I'm relying on what Bob told me. So, the general rule is that a witness can only testify about thing...

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